What To Bring – FHS

What to Bring

During this program, you will stay in Montreal for several weeks. In July and August, the weather can be very hot (30° – 35°) and humid, but sometimes the weather can be cooler (17° – 20°) at night. Sometimes there are rainy days with thunderstorms. The residence building and your classroom building are air conditioned. If you are in homestay, your home may or may not be air-conditioned.

Things to Bring

Here is a checklist of things to bring:

    • passport (also make a photocopy of your passport and keep it separately)
    • money belt
    • if you bring a credit card, make a photocopy of the front and back and keep it separately
    • copies of prescriptions (for glasses or contact lenses, or medication you may need to buy)
    • a laptop computer or tablet (for homework and classwork)
    • sun hat and sunscreen
    • sunglasses
    • toiletries: toothpaste, shampoo, etc. (you can also buy these things here in Canada, at a drugstore or supermarket)
    • shorts
    • T-shirts
    • waterproof jacket
    • long pants
    • a light sweater or a hoodie – some classrooms are cold because of air conditioning (AC)
    • good walking shoes – many activities require a lot of walking
    • swimsuit – there is a pool in the residence
    • slippers to wear in the residence
    • camera, extra memory card and camera batteries
    • if you have contact lenses, bring an extra pair, and your glasses
    • if you have prescription medication, bring enough for your trip, but also bring the prescription (note from the doctor), in case you need to get more
    • there is wifi in the residence and in McGill buildings – you can bring any wireless devices you wish – a smartphone, table or laptop. A laptop computer is recommended for your homework assignments
    • charger for your phone or other device

Electricity

Electricity in Canada is the same as in the United States: 110 volts, 60 Hertz. Most plugs from Japan work in Canada, but Canadian electrical outlets are polarized and have a third prong for ground.

 

 

Image of outlet courtesy Kevin Stanley, McGill University