What To Bring – SBI

What to Bring

During this program, you will stay in Montreal for several weeks. In February and March, the weather can be very cold ( -15° C) and dry, but sometimes the weather can be warmer (-5°C to +5°C) at night. Sometimes there are snowy days. Your homestay, your classroom building and the bus and subway are well heated. You can buy winter clothes in Canada, but it is good to be prepared.

Things to Bring

Here is a checklist of things to bring:

    • passport (also make a photocopy of your passport and keep it separately)
    • money belt
    • if you bring a credit card, make a photocopy of the front and back and keep it separately
    • copies of prescriptions (for glasses or contact lenses, or medication you may need to buy)
    • sunglasses
    • toiletries: toothpaste, shampoo, etc. (you can also buy these things here in Canada, at a drugstore or supermarket)
    • a winter coat
    • long pants
    • long underwear
    • sweaters or hoodies
    • shoes
    • boots
    • gloves
    • a winter hat
    • a scarf
    • slippers to wear at home
    • camera, extra memory card and camera batteries
    • if you have contact lenses, bring an extra pair, and your glasses
    • if you have prescription medication, bring enough for your trip, but also bring the prescription (note from the doctor), in case you need to get more
    • there is internet at your homestay and in McGill buildings – you can bring any wireless devices you wish – a smartphone, table or laptop. A laptop computer is recommended for your homework assignments
    • charger for your phone or other device

If you are wondering about winter, we prepared a video called Winter 101 that you can watch online. It has lots of suggestions about how to survive in the cold weather in Montreal. You can read the transcript of the video in this pdf document: Winter_101_Script.

Electricity

Electricity in Canada is the same as in the United States: 110 volts, 60 Hertz. Most plugs from Japan work in Canada, but Canadian electrical outlets are polarized and have a third prong for ground.

 

 

Image of outlet courtesy Kevin Stanley, McGill University